Friday Music Day — Chicago

I’m going to Chicago this weekend to spend some time with the kiddo. We are doing typical Chicago stuff: A street festival in Andersonville (pride-related), Architectural tour, Cubs-Cardinals game at Wrigley, Gospel Brunch at House of Blues.

The trip got me thinking that for being the County’s 3rd largest City, Chicago isn’t as well known for musical genre’s as other Cities. Of course the Chicago Blues is well known from perhaps the 40’s and 50’s, mostly fueled by the great black migration. Some hip-hop artists recently have become well known, such as Chance the Rapper. And of course Wilco is based in Chicago too.

Back in the 80’s there was a thriving punk scene, but it didn’t really break much nationally. In fact there is documentary on that era unironically called “You Weren’t There” that looks at these 80s Chicago punk bands. It includes the band Da! which was kind of an arty punk band, maybe inspired by The Gang of Four. A good friend of mine was the guitarist.

Anyway what other artists do you think of when (or if) you think of Chicago music?

Also, drop ‘em if you got ‘em.

34 thoughts on “Friday Music Day — Chicago”

    1. Yep: Chicago = Kanye (and to a lesser extent, Twista).
      Last time I was in the city, it was at the end of September 2008, and "Love Lockdown" had just been released, the White Sox forced a game 163 with the Twins, and Obama was close to being elected.
      To me they're all related.

      1. Actually, that wasn't the last time. I was there again the next year.
        But that was the first time I was there for any extended time as an adult and the only time I've been downtown much (the next time was near the airport).

  1. It's interesting how many Chicago bands weren't actually from there. Wilco was a St Louis band that relocated. Poi Dog Pondering was a Hawaiian band.

    1. Also Liz Phair from Lake Forest, Urge Overkill was more of an Evanston Band.

      Replacements, Prince, Soul Asylum, those were Minneapolis dudes. 2/3 of Husker Du from St. Paul with Bob Mould a Macalester attendee.

  2. Totally random list of the day

    1. Gris-Gris Gumob Ya Ya
    2. Jump Sturdy
    3. I Walk On Gilded Splinters
    4. Loop Garoo
    5. Iko Iko
    6. Junko Partner
    7. Tipitina
    8. Right Place, Wrong Time
    9. Such A Night
    10. Goin' Back to New Orleans

  3. 01. "Answering Machine (Solo Home Demo)" – The ReplacementsLet It Be
    02. "Lady" – Herman JonesPurple Snow: Forecasting The Minneapolis Sound
    03. "The Bridge" – Sonny RollinsThe Bridge
    04. "Nothing To Say" – Black DietFind Your Tamborine
    05. "You Really Got A Hold On Me" – The BeatlesWith The Beatles
    06. "Arnika" – Sufjan StevensAll Delighted People EP
    07. "Warm Beer And Cold Women" – Tom WaitsNighthawks At The Diner
    08 "Pink + White" – Frank OceanBlonde
    09. "I Will Return" – Warm GhostNarrows
    10. "Lookout Joe" – Neil YoungTonight's The Night

  4. 1. Shirley Collins “Pretty Polly” Lodestar* (2016)
    2. DJ Shadow “Midnight in a Perfect World” Endtroducing... (1996)
    3. Coldcut “Pan Opticon”* Let Us Play! (1997)
    4. Ha Ha Tonka “In a Big Country”* Reverb Nation Free Download (2009)
    5. Bonnie 'Prince' Billy “Hummingbird, Pt. 2”* Hummingbird (2012)

    6. Fiona Apple “Every Single Night” The Idler Wheel Is Wiser... (2012)
    7. Massive Attack “(Exchange)”* Mezzanine (1998)
    8. Jane's Addiction “Jane Says” Nothing's Shocking (1988)
    9. Ray Charles* “You Win Again” Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music (1962)
    T. Smashing Pumpkins “Zero” Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (1995)

    Holy Oldies Week Batman! Only one song first released this decade, by a singer who I follow due to her work in the 90's.

    *Notes:
    1. This album is the audio equivalent of Dutch "Salty Licorice"... Superficially repellant enough to keep the rest of the family from touching it, but with charms that arise if I power past that displeasure; but I can only take a few [songs/pieces] at a time. Song is "Traditional", from the 1760s if not earlier, though this "modern" version dates to the 1920s. Ms. Collins herself only dates to 1935.

    3. Great piece sampling a ton of mid-90s British protests. "Guilty of violence... guilty of violence against the earth."

    4. Big Country cover, from their 1983 debut.

    5. Leon Russell cover, from his 1970 eponymous album.

    7. Horace Andy on vocals, reprising his 1970 single "See a Man's Face"

    9. Mr. Charles was born in 1930.

  5. Can’t believe nobody’s mentioned Curtis, a Chicago native who grew up in Cabrini-Green:

    John Wright, whose South Side Soul is one of my favorite albums, moved to Chicago with his family at age 2. On a different end of my record collection, the Smoking Popes are from Lake in the Hills.

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