Tag Archives: Luis Tiant

Happy Birthday–November 23

This is a great day for names:

Chief Zimmer (1860)
Hi Church (1863)
Socks Seybold (1870)
George Stovall (1877)
Jimmy Sheckard (1878)
Runt Marr (1891)
Freddy Leach (1897)
Beans Reardon (1897)
Bubber Jonnard (1897)
Prince Hal Schumacher (1910)
Bill Gates (1918)
Charles Osgood (1926)
John Anderson (1929)
Jack McKeon (1930)
Luis Tiant (1940)
Tom Hall (1947)
Ken Schrom (1954)
Brook Jacoby (1959)
Dale Sveum (1963)
David McCarty (1969)
Adam Eaton (1977)
Jonathan Papelbon (1980)
Justin Turner (1984)
Lewis Thorpe (1995)

Runt Marr played in the minor leagues for nineteen years, managed in the minors for fifteen years, and was also a scout for many years.

Beans Reardon was a National League umpire from 1926-1949.

Bubber Jonnard was a long-time coach and scout.

Bill Gates was a minor league pitcher from 1938-1940 and 1946-1951.

Jack McKeon was a long-time manager and general manager, leading the Florida Marlins to a World Series victory in 2003.  In 2011, he became the second-oldest manager in major league history at age 80.  He also managed in the minor leagues for the Senators/Twins from 1957-64 and again in 1968, scouting for the Twins from 1965-67.

Continue reading Happy Birthday–November 23

1970 Rewind: Game Forty-one

MINNESOTA 11, MILWAUKEE 2 IN MINNESOTA

Date:  Thursday, May 28.

Batting stars:  Luis Tiant was 3-for-4 with two runs and three RBIs.  Harmon Killebrew was 2-for-3 with a double and a walk.  Cesar Tovar was 2-for-4 with a three-run homer (his fifth) and a walk.  George Mitterwald was 2-for-4 with a double, two runs, and two RBIs.  Brant Alyea was 2-for-5 with two runs.  Rick Renick was 2-for-5.

Pitching starsLuis Tiant pitched 7.1 innings, giving up two runs on eight hits and three walks and striking out five.  Stan Williams pitched 1.2 scoreless innings, giving up three hits and a walk.

Opposition stars:  Russ Snyder was 4-for-5 with a home run, his second.  Jerry McNertney was 2-for-4.  Danny Walton was 2-for-5.  Tommy Harper was 1-for-4 with a home run, his seventh.

The game:  The Twins put this one away early.  The Brewers got two men on in the first with walks but did not score.  Alyea led off the second with a single.  With one out, singles by Leo CardenasMitterwald, and Tiant made it 2-0.  Tovar walked to load the bases, Carew got an infield single, and a sacrifice fly made it 4-0.

The Twins added some more in the third.  Singles by Rick Renick and Tiant put two on with two out and Tovar hit a three-run homer to put the Twins up 7-0.  Milwaukee got a pair of singles in the fourth but did not score.  In the bottom of the fourth Killebrew and Alyea singled, putting two on with one out.  Renick hit an RBI single.  With two out Mitterwald doubled home a run and Tiant delivered a two-run single to give the Twins a 11-0 lead.

Snyder hit a solo homer in the fifth and Harper hit one in the seventh to cut the lead to 11-2.  The Brewers had two on with two out in the seventh, two on with one out in the eighth, and loaded the bases in the ninth, but the score did not change.

WP:  Tiant (6-0).

LP:  John Morris (2-1).

S:  Williams (2).

Notes:  Renick was at third base, with Killebrew at first and Rich Reese on the bench.  Reese replaced Killebrew in the eighth.  Frank Quilici replaced Cardenas at shortstop in the fifth, presumably due to illness or injury.  He would be back in the lineup the next day.

Tiant was batting .435.  Carew was 1-for-4 and was batting .398.  Tony Oliva was 1-for-4 and was batting .327.  Killebrew was batting .326.  Tovar was batting .302.  Williams had an ERA of 1.55.

Quilici was 0-for-2 and was batting .159.

Tiant was not a particularly good batter through most of his career.  In 1965 and 1968 he batted below .100.  In 1964 and 1966 he batted .111.  He'd only had one year in which his average was higher than that--he batted .254 in 1967.  For his career he batted .164/.185/.224.  I don't know if there was a reason he batted so well in 1970 or if it was just a small sample size fluke, but it's pretty amazing.

Also, Tiant had four RBIs in 1970.  Three of them came in this game.

The Brewers stranded eight men and went 0-for-13 with men in scoring position.

This was one of ten major league starts John Morris made.  He appeared in relief 122 times over an eight-year career.  He was 11-7, 3.95, 1 career save, 1.35 WHIP.

There was apparently a rainout on Wednesday, as there seems no other reason for an off-day in the middle of the series.

Record:  The Twins were 29-12, in first place in the American League West, 2.5 games ahead of California.

1970 Rewind: Game Fourteen

MINNESOTA 6, DETROIT 0 IN MINNESOTA

Date:  Sunday, April 26.

Batting starsLuis Tiant was 3-for-4 with a double and a stolen base.  Cesar Tovar was 2-for-4 with a stolen base, his sixth.  Rich Reese was 2-for-4.  Harmon Killebrew was 2-for-5 with two RBIs.  Tony Oliva was 2-for-5.

Pitching stars:  Tiant pitched a complete game shutout, giving up three hits and a walk and striking out six.

Opposition star:  Dick McAuliffe was 2-for-4.

The game:  The Twins put men on second and third with two out in the third but did not score.  They broke through in the fourth, however.  Oliva singled, Brant Alyea walked, Reese had an infield single to load the bases, and George Mitterwald had another infield single to make it 1-0 Twins.

The Twins put two on in the fifth, but did not score.  They broke the game open in the sixth with a two-out rally.  The first two men were retired, but Frank Quilici singled, Tiant hit an RBI double, Tovar had an infield single, Tiant and Tovar pulled off a double steal, Leo Cardenas tripled them both home, and Killebrew had an RBI single, making the score 5-0 Twins.

The Twins added one more in the eighth.  Tiant singled, a wild pitch moved him to second, Tovar bunted him to third, and Killebrew singled him home.

The Tigers never had a man beyond first base and only once had the leadoff man on base.

WP:  Tiant (3-0).

LP:  Mickey Lolich (4-2).

S:  None.

Notes:  Quilici was again at second in the absence of Rod Carew.  Cardenas remained in Carew's number two spot in the batting order.

Jim Holt replaced Brant Alyea in left field in the eighth inning.  Minnie Mendoza pinch-ran for Killebrew in the eighth and remained in the game at third base.

Tiant was batting .556.  Brant Alyea was 0-for-3 and was batting .390.  Tovar was batting .367.  Oliva was batting .344.  Killebrew was batting .341.  Quilici was batting .308.

Mitterwald was 1-for-4 and was batting .175.  Cardenas was 1-for-5 and was batting .192.

Tiant wasn't a terrible batter over his career, but he wasn't exceptional, either:  a career line of .164/.185/.224.  In 1970, however, he was exceptional:  .406/.424/.531 in 32 at-bats.  Small sample size, obviously, and maybe that's the full explanation.  But it's still pretty amazing.  The stolen base he got in this game was the only one he had in his career, and it was a steal of third on the front end of a double steal.  I don't know how many players have a steal of third as the only stolen base of their career, but I suspect it's a pretty short list.

This was Tiant's only shutout in 1970, and one of two complete games.

Lolich pitched 5.2 innings, allowing five runs on ten hits and a walk and striking out six.  It was the Tigers' fifteenth game of the season, and it was Lolich's sixth start.  The other five had been complete games (one of them 9.2 innings) and two of them had been shutouts.  Lolich pitched over 200 innings every year from 1964-1975; over 220 from 1968-1975; over 240 from 1969-1975; over 270 from 1970-1974, and over 300 from 1971-1974, with a high of 376 in 1971.  Interestingly, he only led the league in starts and complete games once, both 1971, when he had 45 starts and 29 complete games.  He continued to be an effective starter through age 35, and had a really good half-season as a reliever for the Padres in 1978, when he was thirty-seven.  Memory and a google search reveal that he was considered overweight, but he's listed at 6' 1", 170.  If he was overweight, it certainly didn't affect his pitching.

The Twins had won four, lost two, won four, lost two, and now won two.  Could they win four?

Record:  The Twins were 10-4, in first place in the American League West by winning percentage, but a half game behind California.

Happy Birthday–November 23

This is a great day for names:

Chief Zimmer (1860)
Hi Church (1863)
Socks Seybold (1870)
George Stovall (1877)
Jimmy Sheckard (1878)
Runt Marr (1891)
Freddy Leach (1897)
Beans Reardon (1897)
Bubber Jonnard (1897)
Prince Hal Schumacher (1910)
Bill Gates (1918)
Charles Osgood (1926)
John Anderson (1929)
Jack McKeon (1930)
Luis Tiant (1940)
Tom Hall (1947)
Ken Schrom (1954)
Brook Jacoby (1959)
Dale Sveum (1963)
David McCarty (1969)
Adam Eaton (1977)
Jonathan Papelbon (1980)
Justin Turner (1984)
Lewis Thorpe (1995)

Runt Marr played in the minor leagues for nineteen years, managed in the minors for fifteen years, and was also a scout for many years.

Beans Reardon was a National League umpire from 1926-1949.

Bubber Jonnard was a long-time coach and scout.

Bill Gates was a minor league pitcher from 1938-1940 and 1946-1951.

Jack McKeon was a long-time manager and general manager, leading the Florida Marlins to a World Series victory in 2003.  In 2011, he became the second-oldest manager in major league history at age 80.  He also managed in the minor leagues for the Senators/Twins from 1957-64 and again in 1968, scouting for the Twins from 1965-67.

Continue reading Happy Birthday–November 23