21 thoughts on “May 16, 2019: Promised Land”

  1. Dan Hayes & Zack Pierce of The Athletic — Minnesota have a new Twins “podcast”: Puckett, We’ll Do It Live. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to figure out how to add any of The Athletic’s “podcasts” to my podcast player; they must be played in-app, and that experience sucks. Plus, they’re not delivered via RSS, so they’re not actually podcasts, which are syndicated. They’re proprietary audio shows locked into The Athletic’s platform.

    1. Aggravating. I was considering listening to them but probably not now. I understand requiring people to be subscribers but authenticated RSS feeds exist elsewhere. It's possible to download the episodes at least.

    1. A hoarse voice can mean many things, most of which aren’t life-threatening. As a lifelong smoker and the literal posterboy for White Owl cigars and Raleigh cigarettes, it was plausible that Babe Ruth just couldn’t smoke the way he used to, and that the problem would go away on its own if he cut back.

      But between September and November of 1946, things only got worse. Ruth’s runaway voice was accompanied by severe eye pain and weakness in his record-breaking shoulders. At a doctor’s appointment in Manhattan’s now-defunct French Hospital, doctors found exactly what they feared: A tumor protruding from the base of Ruth’s skull.

      Dr. Nadim Bikhazi, an ear, nose, and throat doctor, is the author of a headline-making 1999 article for the journal Laryngoscope titled “‘Babe’ Ruth’s illness and its impact on medical history.” In his paper, Bikhazi used the remaining scraps of Ruth’s original medical reports to piece together the progression of the legend’s disease. Though it appears Ruth was never told he had cancer—when Ruth arrived at Memorial Sloan-Kettering for treatment, he reportedly said, “Doc, this is Memorial. Memorial is a cancer hospital. Why are you bringing me here?”—he was swiftly subjected to the painful cancer therapies of the day.

      This is a fascinating article. I wasn’t aware of the connection between chemotherapy and covered-up Allied war crimes in Italy, or the (biographically fitting) source of the drug Babe was given for treatment.

      No one told Babe Ruth he had cancer, but his death changed the way we fight it | Popular Science

      1. between chemotherapy and covered-up Allied war crimes in Italy

        I tell this story often in my medicinal chemistry classes. Like too much of medical research, those were horrible circumstances and also pretty crucial observations and inferences to develop a new treatment.

    1. Couldn't they have just transferred him to them 60 day at this point, clearing the spot on the 40 man? They must really be skeptical that he'll be back before the end of the year.

      1. BR says he's out until the end of May, he has zero games for 2019, so that's at least 60 days. But, it looks like he was on his way back.

        The veteran setup man had been pitching on a rehab assignment in Triple-A Rochester after opening the season on the injured list due to a thumb sprain, though Dan Hayes of The Athletic tweets that Reed’s velocity was topping out at 88-89 mph in recent appearances.

        That probably made him ineligible for the 60-day list so he gets released instead.

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